Today We Celebrate Women’s Equality Day

Today we celebrate the ratification of the 19th amendment that gave women the right to vote. Let’s all take a moment today to thank the women who came before us and made this day possible. This generation has been handed an amazing opportunity to live and work freely in this country.

But as we celebrate our foremothers, we must also carry on their work. In this country and around the world, gender discrimination is alive and well.

  • Women are paid 78 cents for every dollar earned by a man.
  • The U.S. has no guaranteed medical leave for childbirth
  • Women only make up 16% of our representatives in Congress
  • Abortion and contraceptives are constantly challenged by right wing state governments and religious extremists. Some states require women to view sonograms before an abortion. In Illinois a young woman’s parents must be notified before the procedure.
  • Each and every day of our lives we are confronted by magazines, TV ads and movies that challenge our self esteem and our feelings of self worth so that we will buy their product.

This is only a fraction of the things we must continue to fight. So, today, let us be thankful, but let us also be vigilant of the rights we must protect and let us be active in the fight to obtain the rights that we deserve.

Ratify CEDAW – Call Your Senators August 26th!

The United States remains the only democracy in the world that has not ratified the CEDAW treaty, putting our country in the company of nations such as Iran, Somalia and Sudan. One hundred eighty-six countries, over 95 percent of United Nations members, have ratified CEDAW. It provides a fundamental framework for ending international violence against women, ensuring girls access to education, and promoting economic opportunity and political participation for women. The U.S. is long overdue in ratifying it.

The CEDAW treaty for the rights of women, formally known as the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, provides a universal standard for women’s human rights.  It addresses discrimination in areas such as education, employment, marriage and family relations, health care, politics, finance and law.

Full Text of CEDAW

Call your senators at 202-224-3121 and urge them to support ratification of the CEDAW treaty for the Rights of Women today!

SAMPLE MESSAGE

As your constituent, I am calling to urge you to support immediate ratification of the CEDAW treaty for the rights of women, which is critical to ending violence against women and girls and to providing economic opportunity.
SAMPLE E-MAIL

Dear Senator,

I am writing to urge your support for women’s human rights globally by ratifying the CEDAW
treaty for the rights of women.

The CEDAW treaty provides a universal standard for women’s human rights. It provides a fundamental framework for ending international violence against women, ensuring girls access to education, and promoting economic opportunity and political participation for women. To date, 186 countries have ratified CEDAW. The United States is the only democratic nation that has failed to do so, and as such is in the company of countries such as Sudan, Iran and Somalia.

The United States should strive to be a leader and set an example for the rest of world in its
commitment to women and expanding women’s rights.  I urge you to work to ensure immediate ratification of the CEDAW treaty.